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Equipment : Transportation

Transportation

A table of tranportation used in role playing games and fantasy stories, with costs. With regard to ships, the description may note how many large weapons it can carry (i.e. catapults). See the chart at the bottom of this page for a list of ship weaponry that can be used on ships.

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Water Transportation

Item NamePriceDescription
BargePrice: 500 gpDescription: Details
A long, flat boat, typically used for transporting cargo down rivers and close the shore, or ferrying passengers. Not meant for ocean voyages or deep sea travel.
Boat, CollapsiblePrice: 500 gpDescription: Details
A portable boat, meant to carry 1 to 2 passengers over short spans in calm water. The boat 'collapses' and can be carried by a single individual, although it is quite bulky. The boat's flexible design, makes it delicate - rapids and rough water are quite dangerous, and it tips over quite easily.
Canoe, SmallPrice: 30 gpDescription: Details
A canoe is a lightweight narrow boat, typically pointed at both ends and open on top, propelled by one or more seated or kneeling paddlers facing the direction of travel using a single-bladed paddle. A small canoe can carry one to four people (depending on the size).
Canoe, LargePrice: 50 gpDescription: Details
A canoe is a lightweight narrow boat, typically pointed at both ends and open on top, propelled by one or more seated or kneeling paddlers facing the direction of travel using a single-bladed paddle. A large canoe holds 15 paddlers including one coxswain, or cox, for steering.
Canoe, SmallPrice: 30 gpDescription: Details
A canoe is a lightweight narrow boat, typically pointed at both ends and open on top, propelled by one or more seated or kneeling paddlers facing the direction of travel using a single-bladed paddle. A small canoe can hold 6-8 paddlers including one coxswain, or cox, for steering.
Canoe, WarPrice: 100 gpDescription: Details
A war canoe is a large canoe outfitted for warfare. A war canoe holds 15 paddlers including one coxswain, or cox, for steering. The canoe can be armored and is used to carry warriors down rivers or along the shore.
CarrackPrice: 10,000 gpDescription: Details
The Carrack is a warship, and rarely used for trade. Its large size, cargo capacity, speed, and multiple weapons mounts, make it a feared warship. It has three masts, is over 100' long and can equip three large weapons.
CaravelPrice: 5,000 gpDescription: Details
This ship was sailed in late Medieval times and was the type of ship that is widely used by pirates. It normally has two or three masts and square sails. No oars are used. The typical caravel is 70' long and 20' wide and carried a crew of 30-40 men. The ship can carry an average of 150-200 tons, and hold one large weapon.
CatamaranPrice: 2,000 gpDescription: Details
A multi-hulled vessel consisting of two parallel hulls of equal size. Being ballast-free and lighter than a single-hulled ship, a catamaran has a very shallow draught and can sail in shallow waterways. Catamarans can obtain high speeds in windy conditions, but suffer lower speeds when the wind is low. Catamarans are typically single sailed.
Clipper - Large Merchant ShipPrice: 15,000 gpDescription: Details
A very fast sailing ship. They were fast, yachtlike vessels, with three masts and a square rig. They were generally narrow for their length and could carry limited bulk freight.
Coaster / Round ShipPrice: 5,000 gpDescription: Details
A small merchant saling ship that hugs the coasts. It is fitted with two masts with triangular sails, and has a rudder that hangs from one side. The coaster is 60'-70' long and about 20' wide. The standard crew is 20-30 men, and it has a cargo capacity of about 100 tons. Some coasters have a small sterncastle. A coaster is slow and not tremendously seaworthy, but it can carry large amounts of cargo with smaller crews than galleys. Their shallow hulls mean that they can get through reefs where seagoing ships usually cannot. A coaster can hold one large weapon.
CogPrice: 10,000 gpDescription: Details
A sea-going vessel fitted with a single mast and a square-rigged single sail. These vessels were mostly associated with seagoing trade in medieval Europe, particularly in the Baltic Sea region. They range from about 50'-90' in length, with a width of 16'-26'. Cog ships typically hold 100-200 tons of cargo, and can hold one large weapon.
CoraclePrice: 8 gpDescription: Details
A small, light-weight boat that can carry one to four people, and is propelled by oars. Oval in shape and very similar to half a walnut shell, the structure is made of a framework of split and interwoven willow rods, tied with willow bark. The outer layer was originally an animal skin such as horse or bullock hide (corium), with a thin layer of tar to make it fully waterproof.
Curragh / CurrachPrice: 5 gpDescription: Details
A small type of Irish boat with a wooden frame, over which animal skins or hides were once stretched, though now canvas is more usual. A single mast carries a small square sail, but the curragh is usually worked by oars. It is normally 20'-40' feet long. The ship carried 6-8 people and has a limited amount of cargo space (i.e. 5 tons). This ship is too small to carry any large weaponry.
DrakkarPrice: 250 gpDescription: Details
A Viking longship of war, roughly 100' in length, requires a crew of 20-30 oarsmen, with additional space for around 60 warriors. The ship had a single square sail on a mast at the center of the boat. The drakkar is not meant for long ocean voyages - it has limited space on board for many supplies, and no interior sleeping quarters for crew. This ship can carry one large weapon and a ram
DromondPrice: 15,000 gpDescription: Details
A large galley used for either war or trade, with one or two masts and triangular sails. They are known for the 100 oars that jut from the sides (50 on each side). These oars are divided into an upper and lower bank, with one man per oar on the lower bank and three men on the upper bank, requiring around 200 men. The dromond is a very slender ship, about 130'-175' long and 15' wide, and can carry around 70-100 tons of cargo. As a warship, a ram projects from the front just above the water line. Castles are built fore, aft, and midship as firing platforms. The cargo space is then taken up by marines. A dromond is not a seaworthy vessel and usually sails in sight of shore. Like all galleys, they beach at night, since supplies and sleeping accommodations are limited. A drommond can hold three large weapons and a ram
GalleonPrice: 50,000 gpDescription: Details
An enormous sail-driven warship with three or four masts. A galleon normally has three 'through decks' that run the length of the ship, with castles fore and aft. The average size is about 130' long and 30' wide, and have a crew of around 130 men. Cargo capacity is around 500 tons. A galleon can equip four large weapons.
Galley, SmallPrice: 10,000 gpDescription: Details
A small galley is an improved, but smaller version of the dromond. It is around 90'-100' long and 15' wide. The main power comes from 90 oarsmen, but is supplemented by two masts. The cargo capacity is around 100 tons. Like all galleys, the great galley is a coastal vessel, rarely venturing into open water. It is not seaworthy in heavy storms and waits in port for these to pass. A small galley can hold one large weapon and a ram
Galley, LargePrice: 25,000 gpDescription: Details
A large galley is an improved version of the dromond. It is around 130' long and 20' wide. The main power comes from 140 oarsmen, but is supplemented by three masts. The cargo capacity is 150 tons. Like all galleys, the great galley is a coastal vessel, rarely venturing into open water. It is not seaworthy in heavy storms and waits in port for these to pass. A large galley can hold three large weapons and a ram
Galley, WarPrice: 40,000 gpDescription: Details
A war galley is a large galley, outfitted for war. It is around 130' long and 20' wide. The main power comes from 140 oarsmen, but is supplemented by three masts. The cargo capacity is 150 tons. The front end is built as a ram and marines are carried in the cargo hold. Like all galleys, the great galley is a coastal vessel, rarely venturing into open water. It is not seaworthy in heavy storms and waits in port for these to pass. A war galley tyically comes equiped with three large weapons and a ram.
KayakPrice: 250 gpDescription: Details
A kayak is a small, narrow boat primarily designed to be manually propelled by means of a double-bladed paddle. The traditional kayak has a covered deck and one or more cockpits, each seating one paddler. The cockpit is sometimes covered by a spray deck that prevents the entry of water from waves or spray and makes it possible for suitably skilled kayakers to roll the kayak: that is, to capsize and right it without it filling with water or ejecting the paddler.
KnarrPrice: 3,000 gpDescription: Details
A common cargo ship, roughly 50'-75' long and 20' wide. It has a single mast and a square sail, with a few oars at the bow and stern for additional power. The standard crew ranges from 8 to 14 men, and the ship has a small cargo capacity of 10-50 tons. The ship can be used to make long sea voyages, although not comfortably. The flat bottom makes it useful for sailing up rivers and estuaries. Knarrs can hold one small weapon.
LongshipPrice: 10,000 gpDescription: Details
The longship is a standard Viking warship with a single mast and a square sail. An average longship is 75' long with 20-25 oars per side. The ship has a crew of 40-50 men, and can carry an additional 120-150 men. A longship can be used for shipping, but its cargo capacity is only about 50 tons. The ship is capable of making ocean voyages. Longships can hold one large weapon and a ram
Oar, CommonPrice: 2 gpDescription: Details
An oar is an implement used for water-borne propulsion. Oars have a flat blade at one end. Oarsmen grasp the oar at the other end. The difference between oars and paddles are that paddles are held by the paddler, and are not connected with the vessel. Oars generally are connected to the vessel by means of rowlocks or tholes which transmit the applied force to the boat.
Oar, GalleyPrice: 10 gpDescription: Details
A galley oar is much longer than a common oar, used for rowing galley ships.
Raft or Small KeelboatPrice: 100 gpDescription: Details
A raft is any flat structure for support or transportation over water. It is the most basic of boat design, characterized by the absence of a hull. Rafts are usually kept afloat by using any combination of buoyant materials such as wood, sealed barrels, or inflated air chambers (such as pontoons), and are typically propelled by paddles.
Sail, SmallPrice: 20 gpDescription: Details
A sail is a surface, typically made of fabric and supported by a mast, whose purpose is to propel a sailing vessel.
Sail, MediumPrice: 30 gpDescription: Details
A sail is a surface, typically made of fabric and supported by a mast, whose purpose is to propel a sailing vessel.
Sail, LargePrice: 40 gpDescription: Details
A sail is a surface, typically made of fabric and supported by a mast, whose purpose is to propel a sailing vessel.

Land Transportation

Item NamePriceDescription
Buckboard, WagonPrice: 75 gpDescription: Details
A buckboard is a four-wheeled wagon of simple construction meant to be drawn by a horse or other large animal.
CartPrice: 50 gpDescription: Details
A cart is typically pulled by horses or mules, to carry goods. Cart had two wheels, as opposed to 4-wheeled wagons.
Carriage, CommonPrice: 150 gpDescription: Details
A carriage is a wheeled vehicle for people, usually horse-drawn. The carriage is especially designed for private passenger use, though some are also used to transport goods. Carriages are typically covered, with windows that may be drawn shut, hidding the passengers/cargo from view. The driver tended to sit infront of the carriage, outside of the passenger compartment.
Carriage, Ornamented CoachPrice: 1,000 gpDescription: Details
An ornamented coach is a covered, wheeled, horse-drawn vehicle for people. An ornamental carriage is typically engraved and painted, signifying a certain degree of status. The windows can be shut, to avoid view from the public. The driver tended to sit infront of the carriage, outside of the passenger compartment.
Carriage, ExtravagentPrice: 5,000 gpDescription: Details
An ornamented coach is a covered, wheeled, horse-drawn vehicle for people. The carriage is typically gilded and decorated ostentatiously, signifying noble or wealthy owners. The windows can be shut, to avoid view from the public. The driver tended to sit infront of the carriage, outside of the passenger compartment.
Chariot, RidingPrice: 200 gpDescription: Details
The chariot is a type of carriage that is drawn by animals (typically horses). The original horse chariot was a fast, light, open, two-wheeled conveyance drawn by two or more horses that were hitched side by side. The car was little more than a floor with a waist-high semicircular guard in front.
Chariot, WarPrice: 500 gpDescription: Details
A more durable and armored version of the chariot, typically carrying a driver and an archer. Some war chariots have spiked wheels and are pulled by a team of horses.
Mobile RedoubtPrice: 1,500 gpDescription: Details
An enclosed defensive tower built upon a wagon. It is meant to protect soldiers, and provide cover for archers.
Wagon, OpenPrice: 150 gpDescription: Details
A wagon (also spelt waggon in British and Commonwealth English) is a heavy four-wheeled vehicle pulled by draught animals, used for transporting goods, commodities, agricultural materials, supplies, and sometimes people. Wagons are distinguished from carts, which have two wheels, and from lighter four-wheeled vehicles primarily for carrying people, such as carriages. An open wagon had no covering, with it's contents exposed.
Wagon, ClosedPrice: 250 gpDescription: Details
A wagon (also spelt waggon in British and Commonwealth English) is a heavy four-wheeled vehicle pulled by draught animals, used for transporting goods, commodities, agricultural materials, supplies, and sometimes people. Wagons are distinguished from carts, which have two wheels, and from lighter four-wheeled vehicles primarily for carrying people, such as carriages. A closed wagon is covered, typically by fabric or cloth.
Wagon or Cart WheelPrice: 5 gpDescription: Details
The wooden wheel for a wagon or cart. Wagon wheels, being constructed of wood, tended to be fragile when used on rough terrain, or when being driven at quicker speeds. Cracking and splintering of wood was common, and wheels need to be replaced occassionally.

Ship Weaponry

Below is a list of ship weaponry. These weapons do not include individual melee or ranged weapons (such as bows). Ballistas and light catapults are considered light ship weapons. Heavy and normal catapults are large weapons ship weapons. Two light ship weapons can be substituted for one large ship weapon.

Item NamePriceWeightDamageCriticalRangeCrew
BallistaPrice: 50000Weight: 800Damage: 3d6Critical: 19-20/x3Range: 120 yrdsCrew: 1
     Ballista boltPrice: 100Weight: 9Damage: Critical: Range: Crew: 
Catapult, heavyPrice: 80000Weight: 2400Damage: 6d6Critical: -Range: 200 yrds (min 100yrds)Crew: 4
     Shot, HeavyPrice: 100Weight: 50Damage: Critical: Range: Crew: 
CatapultPrice: 55000Weight: 1500Damage: 4d6Critical: Range: 150 yrds (min 100yrds)Crew: 3
     ShotPrice: 100Weight: 25Damage: Critical: Range: Crew: 
Catapult, lightPrice: 40000Weight: 800Damage: 3d6Critical: Range: 100 yrds (min 50yrds)Crew: 2
     Shot, LightPrice: 100Weight: 20Damage: Critical: Range: Crew: 
RamPrice: 30000Weight: 120Damage: Critical: 5d6Range: NACrew: 

 

 

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